CO ADAPTIVE ARCHITECTURE

New York creates a new kind of shelter to help the city track its feral cat population

It’s estimated that there are over 10,000 stray cats in New York City. But with myriad other human problems, issues like feral cats tend to fall by the city’s wayside. A recent competition organized by Architects for Animals asked the city’s designers to address the burgeoning problem by designing a prototype cat shelter that could be replicated throughout the five boroughs

The results of months of testing were unveiled in December at a exhibition benefiting the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals. Attendees voted for their favorites from a lineup of entrants that included FXFowleGage ClemenceauH3RMJM; Team Anemoi (Christina Ciardullo, Wanlika Kaewkamchand, Hiroko Nakatani, and Kate Kulpa), and a collaboration between The American Street Cat, Inc. founder, Kathryn Walton and Co Adaptive Architecture.

Exhibition underdogs (or, at least, youngsters) Co Adaptive Architecture left the victors that night, with a design that proposed simple, tech-based solutions to tracking and caring for strays. The team proposed a wireless network of shelter nodes and larger colony "base stations" that mimic the natural habitation patterns of strays, which tend to form "colonies" of separate but proximal nodes. Co Adaptive created a system of individual shelters, each equipped with a pressure sensor, scale, and radio transmitter. The shelters sense when a cat has entered the space, sending a data packet back to central "base stations" that includes the cat’s weight and duration of stay. This information is uploaded to the web in real-time, where the Mayor’s Alliance and other animal welfare organizations can use it to monitor the health of the city’s feral populations.

Co Adaptive Architecture is a Brooklyn-based office, founded by fellow GSAPP grads Ruth Mandl and Bobby Johnston earlier this year. You can check out their website over here.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo-illustration of several big-box retail stores.
    Equity

    After the Retail Apocalypse, Prepare for the Property Tax Meltdown

    Big-box retailers nationwide are slashing their property taxes through a legal loophole known as "dark store theory." For the towns that rely on that revenue, this could be a disaster.

  2. A photo of British Prime Minister Theresa May announcing her government's Brexit deal outside No. 10 Downing Street
    Equity

    Britain Finally Has a Brexit Deal. Everyone Hates It.

    Amid resignations, it's clear the U.K. government massively misjudged how leaving the European Union would play out.

  3. Life

    Inside the Movement to Derail Amazon HQ2 Incentives

    New York and Virginia politicians and activists could still make changes to Amazon HQ2 packages—or at least stop the next bidding war from mirroring this one.

  4. A photo of a small small house in San Francisco's Noe Valley that sold for $1.8 million in 2014.
    Equity

    Why Cities Must Tackle Single-Family Zoning

    As cities wake up to their housing crises, the problems with single-family-home residential zoning will become too egregious to ignore.

  5. A man holding a toddler walks past open-house signs in front of condominiums for sale.
    Life

    Millennials Are More Likely to Buy Their First Homes in Cities

    New research finds that Millennials are 21 percent more likely to buy their first homes near city centers than Generation X.