Flickr/Cacostello

Which countries are home to the most valuable names in business?

Google tops the list of the world’s most valuable brands, besting Microsoft, Walmart and BMW among others. But which countries have the greatest concentrations of the global brands?

Together, my MPI colleagues Charlotta Mellander, Zara Matheson and I coded the list of Global 500 brands by location and charted them by country. The chart below shows the total brand value (in millions of dollars) of the top 25 nations.

The United States tops the list with 167 of the world’s leading brands and an estimated brand value of $1.3 trillion (40.6 percent of the global total). Only the European Union nations as a whole come close, with 30.2 percent of the leading 500 global brands, a value of $991 billion.

Japan ranks second, with a brand value of $324 billion, 10 percent of the world total. France is third with 39 brands valued at $243 billion, 7.4 percent of the world total. Germany is fourth, the U.K. is fifth and Switzerland is sixth. China comes in seventh with 18 brands and a total brand value of $99 billion, just 3 percent of the world total and less than a tenth of the US brand value. The BRICs - Brazil, Russian, India and China - have a total brand value of $275 billion, 8.4 percent of the world total, and roughly 20 percent of US brand value.

In a marketplace era when brands matter more than ever, America has far and away the best portfolio. Though China may overtake the U.S. in economic output, it will be quite some time before its brands rival those of the U.S. That’s something that pundits who predict the U.S.’s imminent economic decline should keep in mind.

On Thursday, I'll take look at how the major U.S. cities stack up on global brands.

Photo courtesy of Flicker user Cacostella.

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