A new Google map hack lets you create wild, trippy images of your favorite city streets 

City dwellers have a tendency to think that the whole world revolves around their respective cities. While New Yorkers are correct in the assumption (just kidding!), a new Google Maps hack allows you to access Streetview through a trippy panoramic fisheye lens, turning your favorite city street into a microcosmic earth or an immersive urban whirlpool. The hack uses data from Streetview to create stereographic images that either wrap a stretch of road into a planetary ball or conversely explode Streetview outwards, creating swirling vortexes of urban fabric. Prosthetic Knowledge gave an italicized warning about how this is “probably the best way to waste your day,” and boy were they right. Two hours after exploring planet Kyoto, I took my final screenshots of a spherical Las Vegas Strip.

Kyoto, Japan

Visiting the Colosseum

The San Francisco Swirl (future ice cream flavor?)

Hong Kong

Paris, France

Paris, Las Vegas

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    How Seattle Bucked a National Trend and Got More People to Ride the Bus

    Three experts in three very different positions weigh in on their city’s ridership success.

  2. Design

    Experimental City: The Sci-Fi Utopia That Never Was

    With solar energy, recycling, computers, and personal mass transit, the 1960s-era Minnesota Experimental City was a prescient and hopeful vision of the urban future. A new documentary tells its story.

  3. Equity

    The Side Pittsburgh Doesn't Want You to See

    Pittsburgh filmmaker Chris Ivey has spent over twelve years documenting the lives of the people displaced so that the city can achieve its “cool” status.  

  4. Construction workers build affordable housing units.
    Equity

    Why Is 'Affordable' Housing So Expensive to Build?

    As costs keep rising, it’s becoming harder and harder for governments to subsidize projects like they’ve done in the past.

  5. Transportation

    If You Drive Less Than 10,000 Miles a Year, You Probably Shouldn't Own a Car

    Up to one-quarter of all U.S. drivers might be better off using ride-sharing services instead.