Reuters

Half of Detroit's children live in poverty, more than double the state average

Fifty-one percent of Detroit's children live in poverty, according to a new report from Kids Count, a Michigan based organization. That's more than double the state average of 22 percent and a 13 percent jump between 2005 and 2009. Another startling statistic - more than 80 percent of children in Detroit Public Schools now qualify for free student lunches.

"The general situation [in Detroit] pretty much mirrors what's happening in Michigan in terms of trends, [but] the level of economic distress in the city is much more acute than the state as a whole," study director Jane Zehnder-Merrell told The Huffington Post.

There is some good news. According to HuffPo:

The rate of confirmed victims of abuse and/or neglect improved by 5 percent with a rate of 16 victims per 1,000 children, compared with the statewide rate of 14 per 1,000. The city also experienced a 25 percent decline in the rate of child deaths over the past decade. In 2009, 318 children up to age 14 died, down from 471 in 2000.

Find the complete study here.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    The Many Lives of Notre-Dame

    Far from being a single author’s definitive text, the beloved cathedral’s history is a palimpsest.

  2. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  3. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  4. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

  5. Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California
    Life

    America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

    Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.