Reuters

Half of Detroit's children live in poverty, more than double the state average

Fifty-one percent of Detroit's children live in poverty, according to a new report from Kids Count, a Michigan based organization. That's more than double the state average of 22 percent and a 13 percent jump between 2005 and 2009. Another startling statistic - more than 80 percent of children in Detroit Public Schools now qualify for free student lunches.

"The general situation [in Detroit] pretty much mirrors what's happening in Michigan in terms of trends, [but] the level of economic distress in the city is much more acute than the state as a whole," study director Jane Zehnder-Merrell told The Huffington Post.

There is some good news. According to HuffPo:

The rate of confirmed victims of abuse and/or neglect improved by 5 percent with a rate of 16 victims per 1,000 children, compared with the statewide rate of 14 per 1,000. The city also experienced a 25 percent decline in the rate of child deaths over the past decade. In 2009, 318 children up to age 14 died, down from 471 in 2000.

Find the complete study here.

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