Flickr/Ed Yourdon

The economic recovery remains uneven according to a Brookings Metro Monitor report released today.

The economic recovery remains uneven across cities and regions, according the Brookings Metro Monitor released today.

The map below shows how the United States' 100 largest metros have performed for the last quarter of 2011 across a range of key economic indicators including jobs, unemployment, economic output,  and housing prices.

(Click the image to view the interactive map with metro area details)

The dark blue dots indicate the best performing metros, the lighter blue dots indicate next 20 strongest. The gray dots represent the 20 metros in the middle-of-the-pack. And the red dots indicate the weakest performing metros (with dark red dots for the 20 worst performers and lighter red for the next 20 weakest performers).

The strongest performing metros include a mix of knowledge and high-tech regions (Austin, San Jose, Boise, and Portland), rebounding manufacturing metros (Detroit, Grand Rapids, Youngstown, and Toledo), and natural resource centers (Houston, Oklahoma City, and New Orleans).  

While employment has rebounded from its low point in 94 of the 100 largest metros, just five have gained back all the jobs they lost during the economic crisis. A quarter have gained back more than half of all the jobs they lost as a consequence of the crisis, the study notes. Only 19 large metros saw improvement in both their rate of job growth and  growth in economic output.

While economic conditions continue to improve across U.S. metros, the metro-covery still has a long way to go.

Image: Ed Yourdon/Flickr

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