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Zipcar ranks U.S. cities on innovation, sustainability, and creativity.

Earlier this week, Zipcar published its Future Metropolis Index. To develop the Index, the company teamed up with KRC Research to rank the top 36 most populated U.S. cities on five factors: sustainability, innovation, vibrancy, efficiency, and livability. 

Here's a slide show of the top ten cities on the overall index developed by Cities writer Tyler Falk.

Here's how the cities break down in the five sub-categories:

  • In the innovation category, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, and Boston top the list.
  • Tuscon, Arizona, Portland, Oregon, and San Francisco are best in sustainability.
  • San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C., lead in vibrancy/creativity.
  • The most efficient cities are Washington, D.C., New York, and Boston.
  • For livability, El Paso, Texas, New York, and San Diego take top honors.

The study also found that Americans who live in metro areas are more optimistic about job opportunities than those living outside them.

The ranking and survey make sense for Zipcar, a company that provides car-sharing services to urban dwellers.  

"The results of our Future Metropolis Index make a powerful statement about an urban renaissance that we see is clearly underway," Scott Griffith, chairman and CEO of Zipcar, said in a press release. "U.S. cities are growing and evolving and are more dynamic than ever before. This rebirth of our cities is being powered by technology and innovation coupled with smart urban policy which together work to enhance the lives of their residents."

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