There are signs that the U.S. housing market is finally bouncing off its bottom.

The U.S. housing market may finally be bouncing off its bottom, according to the newly released Trulia Price Monitor, which tracks housing prices for major markets across the nation.

According to Trulia chief economist Jed Kolko, the new price monitor represents a significant improvement in major home price indexes, tracing housing price movements "almost in real–time" and covering more metro areas. The Trulia Price Monitor differs from other indices in that it is based on "asking prices" as opposed to actual sale prices.

The first edition of the report shows that housing prices nationally appear to have bottomed out in January of this year and were 1.4 percent higher in March than one quarter ago, based on the on-sale home prices tracked by the index.

But what's really interesting is the metro level tracking. The housing market remains extremely uneven across the country.  The first graphic below shows the markets with the largest year-over-year price declines.



The second graphic tracks markets with the largest housing price increases. While some established markets have performed well over the course of the crisis, the Trulia Price Monitor saw several hard-hit markets bounce off the bottom.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    The Price Black Voters Paid to Defeat Roy Moore

    Black voters endured waves of voter suppression to help elect Doug Jones to the U.S. Senate, and it didn’t have to be that way.

  2. Downtown Roanoke is pictured.
    Life

    The Small Appalachian City That’s Thriving

    Roanoke, Virginia, has become what many cities of its size, geography, and history want to be. It started by bringing housing to a deserted downtown.

  3. Equity

    Is the Rental Housing Explosion Over?

    For the first time since 2005, growth in new rental housing slowed down. Are there really enough apartments to meet demand?

  4. A maglev train on a test track outside Tokyo. A scheme to build a line between Baltimore and Washington, D.C., has been in the works for years.
    Transportation

    The Battle of the Supertrains

    Promoters are touting two different multi-billion-dollar high-speed projects between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore. Is it a fantasy, or a game changer?

  5. Broadacre City model
    Design

    When Frank Lloyd Wright Comes to Harlem

    A show at Columbia University illuminates the celebrated architect’s vision for housing in America by placing it alongside the urban brick apartment towers he loathed.