The first installment in a five-part series featuring Richard Florida leading a conversation on the future of the Motor City.

Detroit Rising bug
A determined city looks to the future See full coverage

"So much has been said of the crisis of Detroit or the ruin of Detroit. I think what's really interesting is, enough's been said about that. It's really an interesting place to look at as a laboratory of rebuilding. ... Great economic crises are generational events. We're only four or five years into this one, and already you can see the seeds of renewal and revitalization." -- Richard Florida

Last month, Cities readers sent in their questions and ideas on the current state of Detroit and where it's heading. Over the next several weeks, Atlantic Senior Editor Richard Florida responds by leading a conversation on the future of the Motor City.

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