Sign a waiver and pay a small fee, and you can destroy all sorts of furniture, electronics, even mannequins.

If the idea of obliterating everything in your sight with a baseball bat, free of repercussions, sounds like the ultimate stress reliever, consider visiting Dallas's Anger Room.

While there, you can destroy all sorts of furniture, electronics, and even mannequins for a fee and a signed waiver. A five-minute "I Need a Break" session costs $25; a 15-minute "Lash Out" booking is $45; and 25 minutes of "Total Demolition" will set you back $75. 

Owner Donna Alexander tells The Week she came up with the idea as a teen. She started test trials in her garage, inviting friends and co-workers to destroy what they could. It was a hit, leading Alexander to lease space in a Dallas strip mall in late 2011. The exact location is only disclosed after scheduling an appointment.

The objects provided are acquired from public donations, curbside pickups, and an electronic waste company. All objects are recycled after annihilation. Customers are also welcome to bring their own objects from home. 

Unleashing your rage on a bunch of unwanted household items you don't even own might spell relief, but that doesn't mean the owners think they replace anyone's need for professional help. As their disclaimer states:

*Anger Room LLC does not claim to be a mental help or medical facility, we do not treat, give diagnosis or provide medical therapy of any kind. We are classified as entertainment only, if you feel that you have any mental or medical issues that needs to be treated please see a licensed physician or obtain a referral. Thank You.*

According to company policy, a helmet and goggles are mandatory.

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