The Village

In Russia, an app identifies "parking douches."

No one likes crummy parking jobs. But drivers take it to another level in Russia.

According to this video from online newspaper The Village, cars in Russia tend to anchor their wheels wherever they please – from sidewalks to front yards to crosswalks. To combat this, The Village has launched an apparently real phone app called Parking Douche to publicly identify and ostracize impolite parkers.

The app's explanatory video says that the Parking Douche app enables pedestrians to take pictures of poorly parked cars, along with their license plate numbers. "The data are streamed live to meta-ads that are targeted through an IP address, so people who live or work close to the locations these cars were parked see it," the video explains. It apparently creates pop-up ads that appear on neighbors' computers "interrupting you while you're trying to read an online article" displayed on The Village and its partner sites.

 

Though Parking Douche seems to be little more than a clever ad campaign, it's not a bad idea for a mobile application – minus the automatic pop-ups. It's a slightly more advanced version of the "You Park Like an Asshole" project.

While calling people names might not be the most constructive way to start a dialogue with bad parkers, maybe it will inspire a more civilized parking culture in cities. At the very least, perhaps drivers will be shamed into better parking.

Image credit: The Village

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A LimeBike is pictured next to a Capital Bikeshare dock.
    Transportation

    Bike Share, Unplanned

    Three private bike-share companies are determined to shake up the streets of D.C. But what, exactly, are they trying to disrupt?

  2. Transportation

    Why Are Little Kids in Japan So Independent?

    In Japan, small children take the subway and run errands alone, no parent in sight. The reason why has more to do with social trust than self-reliance.

  3. Equity

    What the New Urban Anchors Owe Their Cities

    Corporations like Google and Amazon reap the spoils of winner-take-all urbanism. Here’s how they can also bear greater responsibility.

  4. Rescue crews and observers on top of the rubble from a collapsed building that fell in the Condesa neighborhood of Mexico City.
    Environment

    A Brigade of Architects and Engineers Rushed to Assess Earthquake Damage in Mexico City

    La Casa del Arquitecto became the headquarters for highly skilled urbanists looking to help and determine why some buildings suffered more spectacularly than others.

  5. A prospective buyer looks at a rendering of a new apartment complex in Seoul in 2005.
    Design

    Why Koreans Shun the Suburbs

    In cities around the world, harried urbanites look to the suburbs for more space or a nicer house for their money. But in South Korea, the city apartment is still the dream.