The fourth installment in a five-part series featuring Richard Florida leading a conversation on the future of the Motor City.

"If you want to rebuild a neighborhood, you're a lot better off starting with stuff people eat and drink. Movie theaters, fine, baseball stadiums great. But where people really want to go is to find places to eat and drink." -- Richard Florida

In April, Cities readers sent in their questions and ideas on the current state of Detroit and where it's heading. Over the last several weeks, Atlantic Senior Editor Richard Florida has led a conversation on the future of the Motor City. This is the fourth installment.

Watch the introduction to the series, along with the first installment on the state of Detroit, the second on the city's creative potential and the third on the faces behind the city's rebirth.

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