The recession and housing crisis hit every city a little differently.

The recession and housing crisis hit every city a little differently. The chart below, from a McKinsey Global Institute report, ranks the country's most recovered cities, looking at factors like unemployment, homes in negative equity, and educational attainment. Note that even when two cities have a relatively similar story to tell, such as Dallas and Houston, there are still significant differences when it comes to strengths and weaknesses. It's a good reminder that no matter what happens at the federal level, every locality in the country is going to have to find its own path back. 

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