The fifth installment in a five-part series featuring Richard Florida leading a conversation on the Motor City.

"If you think of a place that was close to death and is now entering into a new life, that's Detroit. Why does that happen? Well there's great space available, there's affordability. But cities attract different people ... Detroit is a place where anything goes. It's a place that's open to people." -- Richard Florida

In April, Cities readers sent in their questions and ideas on the current state of Detroit and where it's heading. Over the last several weeks, Atlantic Senior Editor Richard Florida has led a conversation on the future of the Motor City. This is the fifth and final installment.

Watch the introduction to the series, along with the first installment on the state of Detroit, the second on the city's creative potential, the third on the faces behind the city's rebirth, and the fourth on Detroit's business revolution.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  2. MapLab

    Introducing MapLab

    A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

  3. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  4. Equity

    The Story Behind the Housing Meme That Swept the Internet

    How a popular meme about neoliberal capitalism and fast-casual architecture owned itself.

  5. The Kunsthaus in Graz, Austria.
    Design

    The Prophetic Side of Archigram

    It’s easy to see the controversial group’s influence in left field architecture from High-Tech to Blobism 50 years later, but it’s easier still to see it in emerging technologies and the way we interact with them.