The fifth installment in a five-part series featuring Richard Florida leading a conversation on the Motor City.

"If you think of a place that was close to death and is now entering into a new life, that's Detroit. Why does that happen? Well there's great space available, there's affordability. But cities attract different people ... Detroit is a place where anything goes. It's a place that's open to people." -- Richard Florida

In April, Cities readers sent in their questions and ideas on the current state of Detroit and where it's heading. Over the last several weeks, Atlantic Senior Editor Richard Florida has led a conversation on the future of the Motor City. This is the fifth and final installment.

Watch the introduction to the series, along with the first installment on the state of Detroit, the second on the city's creative potential, the third on the faces behind the city's rebirth, and the fourth on Detroit's business revolution.

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