How ubiquitous data and smart city infrastructure may change urban experience.

Welcome to the "meta-city." It's a networked urban world of smart infrastructure and ubiquitous data that could soon become the typical city experience.

Just by looking around, you'll be able to see where that bus across the street is going, when the train you need is leaving, how to buy a ticket, when the weather's going to turn nasty, what's located on the fourth floor of that pretty building in front of you, and exactly where you can charge your phone – likely the screen-of-choice for displaying all this information in the smart (and, it turns out, incredibly helpful) city of the future.

The meta-city is visualized in this video as a "hybrid digital physical environment" where information about one's surroundings can be superimposed in real-time to create a data-rich view of the functions and actors within a city.

Urban Times, in collaboration with design mind, has been running a series of interesting stories and videos over the past few weeks exploring the various ways that technology is changing and could potentially change cities today and in the near future. The video was produced by frog, a technology and interaction design firm that also publishes design mind.

Explosive innovation and adoption of computing, mobile devices, and rich sources of data are changing the cities in which we live, work, and play. A digital landscape overlays our physical world and is expanding to offer ever-richer experiences that complement, and in emerging cases, replace the physical experience.

There's a lot of talk about the smart cities of the future. It's nice to actually see in a realistic city setting how some of these technologies could become part of the way we operate with and within information-enriched urban environments.

Image credit: frog

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