How ubiquitous data and smart city infrastructure may change urban experience.

Welcome to the "meta-city." It's a networked urban world of smart infrastructure and ubiquitous data that could soon become the typical city experience.

Just by looking around, you'll be able to see where that bus across the street is going, when the train you need is leaving, how to buy a ticket, when the weather's going to turn nasty, what's located on the fourth floor of that pretty building in front of you, and exactly where you can charge your phone – likely the screen-of-choice for displaying all this information in the smart (and, it turns out, incredibly helpful) city of the future.

The meta-city is visualized in this video as a "hybrid digital physical environment" where information about one's surroundings can be superimposed in real-time to create a data-rich view of the functions and actors within a city.

Urban Times, in collaboration with design mind, has been running a series of interesting stories and videos over the past few weeks exploring the various ways that technology is changing and could potentially change cities today and in the near future. The video was produced by frog, a technology and interaction design firm that also publishes design mind.

Explosive innovation and adoption of computing, mobile devices, and rich sources of data are changing the cities in which we live, work, and play. A digital landscape overlays our physical world and is expanding to offer ever-richer experiences that complement, and in emerging cases, replace the physical experience.

There's a lot of talk about the smart cities of the future. It's nice to actually see in a realistic city setting how some of these technologies could become part of the way we operate with and within information-enriched urban environments.

Image credit: frog

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  2. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  3. Navigator

    The Gentrification of City-Based Sitcoms

    How the future ‘Living Single’ reboot can reclaim the urban narrative ‘Friends’ ran off with.

  4. Maps

    Mapping Where Europe's Population Is Moving, Aging, and Finding Work

    Younger people are fleeing rural areas, migrating northward, and having fewer children. Here’s how that’s changing the region.

  5. A collage of postcards and palms trees of the Florida shore
    Environment

    The Archaeologists Saving Miami's History From the Sea

    As the water level rises, more than 16,000 historic sites across Florida are at risk of being drowned by waves. In Miami-Dade County, researchers are working to keep history on solid ground.