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Creative class residents gather on the east and west coasts.

This week I'll be sharing some more new data on the geography of America's creative class. Nationwide, the creative class totals more than 40 million workers, more than a third of the total workforce, including professionals in the fields of science and technology, design and architecture, arts, entertainment and media, and healthcare, law, management and education.* Today, I start with state-level data.

The map above, by the Martin Prosperity Institute's Zara Matheson and based on data compiled by Kevin Stolarick, charts the creative class share of the workforce for the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Ever the outlier with its entirely urban population, the District of Columbia tops the list, with 57.8 percent of its workforce in creative class occupations. The rest of the top 10 creative class states can be found in the slideshow below.

On the flip side, Nevada is the state with the smallest percentage of the creative class (24.2 percent). Missouri, West Virginia, North and South Dakota, Wyoming, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Indiana, and South Carolina number among the states with the lowest creative class concentrations.

Next time, I'll chart the creative class across American counties.

This post is an abridged and revised excerpt of material from The Rise of the Creative Class, Revisited, out this month from Basic Books.

*The intro of this piece has been updated since it was first published.

Photo credit: nito / Shutterstock.com

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