A new breed of "greenhawks" may be leading the way toward energy independence.

A Tampa TV station has produced a feature highlighting environmental work of the U.S. military – along with important strategic reasons for pursuing renewable energy, installing efficiency measures, and fighting global warming. Reporter Brendan McLaughlin puts it this way in the segment’s opening:

When you think of environmental activists, the Sierra Club and Greenpeace may come to mind. But some argue the US Military is doing more to lead us toward energy independence than any other institution in America. A new breed of so-called ‘greenhawks’ may be leading the way toward energy independence.

The story and video were produced two years ago, but came to my attention this week when a friend posted it on Facebook.  Enjoy and learn:

This post originally appeared on the NRDC's Switchboard blog.

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