Wage growth varies considerably by metropolitan area, according to numbers from the most recent quarter.

America's job machine remains stuck and wages have been slow to recover from the crisis. But wage growth varies considerably by metropolitan area, according to numbers from the most recent quarter released by PayScale, a Seattle-based employee compensation data company.

Over the three-month period, Boston experienced the most wage growth, followed by Seattle and then Dallas, with Miami, San Francisco, and Tampa tied for fourth place. The growth percentages for Detroit, Phoenix, and Riverside also exceed the national average, a glacial 1.3 percent.

St. Louis, Atlanta, Philadelphia, and Minneapolis experienced the most sluggish wage growth, at less than one percent. 

Some of America's very largest metrosNew York, Chicago, L.A., and Houstonas well as Washington, D.C., which has performed relatively well over the course of the Great Recession, saw their wage growth lag behind the national average.

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