Keita Takahashi

The ghosts are all around you at New York's Babycastles Summit.

Get ready to be immersed in an urban world...

The projected street grid of your childhood...

3D Pac-Man at New York's Museum of Art and Design!

As part of the Babycastles Summit 2012, Japanese video game designer Keita Takahashi has created a series of enhanced video games, including the old arcade favorite Pac-Man. It's projected on the walls and ceiling of a small, dark room, and it looks challenging and potentially a bit dizzying. Innovating such an established classic might seem like trying to improve on the bicycle, but we give Takahashi props for trying.

He's also designed high-tech versions of Mario Ball and one of our all-time favorite video games, Duck Hunt. We wait with bated breath for video confirmation on the latter count.

Top image and video courtesy of 3D Pac-Man at the Babycastles Summit.

H/T DesignBoom.

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