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The store's march across America, in maps.

Sam Walton opened his first two stores in Arkansas by 1965:

walmart-map615.png

Ten years later, the retailer had expanded to 104 stores in middle America:

walmart-ap615.png
Business Insider

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By the mid-eighties, Walmart had expanded north and east with 741 stores:

walmart615.png

Ten years later, there were more than 2000 locations across the country:

walmart-map2615.png

By 2005, domination was complete, with 3045 locations.

walmart-map4615.png

Here's the video version:

Rapid Growth of Walmart from Nathan Yau on Vimeo.

Photo credit: K2 images/Shutterstock.com

This post originally appeared on Business Insider, an Atlantic partner site.

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