A video tour of the everyday world of India's third most-populous city.

With more than 8.5 million residents, Bangalore, which Mark Bergen wrote about earlier this morning, is one of the largest cities in the world, and the third largest in rapidly urbanizing India. Despite its significance in the country, the city is less well known than the other major Indian cities of Mumbai, Kolkata, and New Delhi.

This new video from Bangalore-based 1st December Studios offers a simple and elegant introduction to the city with a collection of tilt-shifted shots that highlight day-to-day life there. It's a nice bit of context to help understand one of the biggest cities in the world.

For more on the history of the city, this piece from the July issue of The Caravan details the role the liquor industry has played in Bangalore's development for more than 100 years.

Image courtesy Vimeo user 1st December Studios

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