Pest control is now a spectator sport.

Lorenzo Maggiore's mission was to fund the production of a gun that kills bugs by shooting small amounts of table salt at them. Indiegogo users chose to accept it.

With the looks of a nerf gun, the firing style of a shotgun, and the culinary instinct of a potato gun, the BugASalt lies at the thrilling and profitable intersection of firearms and pest control. (We've been here before.) Salt crystals fan out like pellets, making it deadly - to flies - from about two feet away. All it requires is salt.

Maggiore's product now has almost $500,000 in funding on Indiegogo with four days left to contribute. It's a significant improvement over his stated goal of $15,000. In fact, it's Indiegogo's third-most popular project ever. For $30, you can begin blowing away flies when BugASalts ship this month.

Behold, the BugASalt in action:

Via Core77.

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