The Financial District is one of the angriest places in Manhattan, according to software that measures emotion.

If this was a map of New York City in Grand Theft Auto, the following neighborhoods you'd want to keep out of until you built up your arsenal: Bedford-Stuyvesant, Alphabet City, the Financial District. These are the nabes most prone to blinding rage, according to an app that plots the geography of moods.

Wyst is a free program coded in Brooklyn but registered at an Italian domain, no doubt because (as NTC Hosting points out) it's clever marketing to have your product look like a verb: Wyst.it, why doncha! It's meant so people can share thoughts and stories among their networks in note or photo form (these messages are called "wysts," if you can bring yourself to say it – and since you're probably "tweeting," why not?). The app includes the option of tagging a wyst with an emotion, like "happy," "sad," "surprised," "flirty" and "drunk," because that is too an emotion.

By this metric, the most fun to be had in New York is in Greenpoint. Clearly something is wrong the programming here, as the G train's antics can ruin any amount of pig hocks and cheap beer. If you're into rambling conversations and meatheaded yelling, head on over to Murray Hill or the East Village, because that's where people are wysting while intoxicated. The most surprised people are to be found on Roosevelt Island. They're probably still wondering why they moved there.

The map is posted below. If you're having trouble reading it, here is the full-sized version.

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