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Park Slope residents are complaining that stadium fans are peeing all over the neighborhood.

Go, Team Yellow!

It hasn't been three weeks since the Barclays Center opened and Park Slopers have already found something to complain about: Sports fans who wizz willy-nilly all over the stadium area. Hold on was that edgy rust architecture not intentional?

Residents say that stadiumgoers are turning the Slope into a "cesspool" by peeing on sidewalks and a community garden, according to this heavily investigated story from DNAinfo. (Who knew so many people were afraid to go on the record about public urination?) The urine trouble was hotly discussed during a quality-of-life meeting this week between neighbors and Barclays reps, and two city councilmembers say their offices are swamped with complaints. Come on, people, what is wrong with bathrooms inside the stadium? (Oh, right.)

The nastiest accusation in the DNAinfo story comes from a gardener at the Brooklyn Bears Community Garden, who "watched in horror... when a patron almost relieved himself on some of the garden's greenery":

He was about to release himself on the bushes and I told him, 'Hey, the plants!,'" said Michelle R., a member of the garden who didn't want her last name used. "He was right by the rose bushes, poor babies, a few feet from the grape vines I planted this year."

The arena's brass have promised to speedily address the situation, partly by adding more sidewalk lighting. Meanwhile, let's file this story into the memory box of Brooklyn's tinkle woes, right between leaky dogs killing trees and "Big, Urine-Stained MTA Eyesores."

Illustration courtesy of happydancing on Shutterstock.

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