Universal Everything

Let's think about something beautiful, just for a second.

It has been a day of very, very bad news for the millions of people who live, work and play on the U.S. East Coast between Norfolk, Virginia and Providence, Rhode Island. 

So instead of more scares and destruction, here's a spectacular projection of digital animation on a dark wall in Korea, "Made by Humans," courtesy of Universal Everything, and, financially, Hyundai. Pretty amazing technology on display here, both in creating this animation and putting it on the wall. The lone spectator certainly looks impressed.  

Watch the Creators Project video here, where Universal Everything founder Matt Pyke explains how he works and why. Best part? This is the first of 18 such videos. 

1 of 18 / Made by Humans / Hyundai Vision Hall / Hyundai Motor Group from Universal Everything on Vimeo.

HT FastCo.

More from the Atlantic Cities:

Seeing New York City Simultaneously Night and Day

Bus Stop of the Day: Beethoven Duets in an English Station

Visions of the Past: Recreating World War II in Today's Cities

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