Unless you live near Grand Teton National Park, a Frappuccino is never far away.

A Venti-nonfat-caramel-Frappuccino is no more than 20 miles away from most Americans.

University of Washington doctoral candidate James Davenport posted graphics on his blog charting Starbucks-owned locations in the country two ways: a Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi diagram (fancy names for cool diagrams). As the Atlantic Wire reports on the former, "[T]he green dots representing Starbucks cluster around big cities, and with the connecting lines, the map basically looks the same as a regular old map of the U.S."

This second diagram can determine the places farthest away from Starbucks. According to Davenport's blog, the most frappuccino-lacking town is Alta, Wyoming. (Although he noted in an email that the actual most isolated spot is in nearby Grand Teton National Park.)

Map courtesy of James Davenport's blog, If We Assume

Davenport concludes:

One might define urbanization in the modern era as the distance to the nearest Starbucks. An "urban" environment would therefore be anyplace within a 20 mile radius. Yes, more than 80% of the USA (that's 250,000,000 people) live within 20 miles of a Starbucks.

(h/t Fast Company's Co.Design)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  2. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  3. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

  4. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

  5. An aerial photo of downtown Miami.
    Life

    The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

    Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

×