NASA/NOAA

A satellite capture from Tuesday showed the true scale of the massive weather system.

Anybody who experienced Sandy firsthand knows that it was a big weather system. But they might not have realized that when the storm's east arm was battering the East Coast, its west one was already reaching over to throw punches at Chicago.

The true extent of Sandy can be seen in this image from the Suomi NPP satellite taken early Tuesday morning. The folks behind NOAA's Environmental Visualization Laboratory explain:

This image shows Sandy as imaged by the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP VIIRS instrument's day/night band. This band collects information from the ambient light radiated into space from human settlement and activities and also captures reflected moonlight from cloud structures. The full moon, which enhanced the storm surge that has inundated New York City and Atlantic City because of tidal forces, lit up the cloud tops of the storm in great detail.

The storm has since quieted down, weakening into a innocent surface trough of low pressure over Pennsylvania. But its dissolved carcass is still overshadowing a vast chunk of America's real estate, as you can see in the below GOES East image from this morning (or a video, if you'd prefer):


(NASA/NOAA GOES Project)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Office workers using computers
    Equity

    America’s Digitalization Divide

    A new study maps digital-skilled jobs across industries, metro areas, and demographic groups, revealing deep divides.

  2. Design

    Is This Red, White, and Blue Elephant Worth Saving?

    Illinois politicians agree that Chicago’s Thompson Center should be replaced. Architects and preservationists beg to differ, and a new documentary presents their case.

  3. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.

  4. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  5. Navigator

    The Gentrification of City-Based Sitcoms

    How the future ‘Living Single’ reboot can reclaim the urban narrative ‘Friends’ ran off with.