Harvard's new ecological urbanism app explores current practices, emerging trends, and opportunities for new initiatives.

The Harvard Graduate School of Design released the new Ecological Urbanism app last month. The interactive app, available at the iTunes store, adapts content from the GSD book of the same name, which explores how designers can unite urbanism with environmentalism. Combining data from around the world, the app "reveals and locates current practices, emerging trends, and opportunities for new initiatives" in regard to the future of cities.

The app, a collaboration between the school and Second Story Interactive Studios, stems from the GSD’s Ecological Urbanism conference and dovetails with the duo’s ongoing efforts to explore sustainability in our cities of the future. More than 100 participating architects and designers have provided content for the project, including such heavyweights as OMA, Rem Koolhaas, Kara Oehler, and Stefano Boeri. And the ever-evolving app allows designers and academics to add research and project updates as they happen.

Harvard Graduate School of Design: Ecological Urbanism App from Second Story on Vimeo.

Images: courtesy of iTunes Preview

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  2. Drilling Wells in Los Angeles
    Environment

    Why Is California Approving So Many New Oil Wells?

    Drilling and fracking permits are up since Governor Newsom took office. But it’s not totally clear why.

  3. Maps

    The Three Personalities of America, Mapped

    People in different regions of the U.S. have measurably different psychological profiles.

  4. A colorful mural with a woman's head and words reading "take me out to the go-go."
    Equity

    How Go-Go Music Became Kryptonite for Gentrification in D.C.

    Go-go has become the soundtrack for a growing anti-gentrification movement in Washington. Now a city council bill wants to make it D.C.’s official music.

  5. photo: An elderly resident of a village in Japan's Gunma Prefecture.
    Life

    In Japan’s Vanishing Rural Towns, Newcomers Are Wanted

    Facing declining birthrates and rural depopulation, hundreds of “marginal villages” could vanish in a few decades. But some small towns are fighting back.

×