Harvard's new ecological urbanism app explores current practices, emerging trends, and opportunities for new initiatives.

The Harvard Graduate School of Design released the new Ecological Urbanism app last month. The interactive app, available at the iTunes store, adapts content from the GSD book of the same name, which explores how designers can unite urbanism with environmentalism. Combining data from around the world, the app "reveals and locates current practices, emerging trends, and opportunities for new initiatives" in regard to the future of cities.

The app, a collaboration between the school and Second Story Interactive Studios, stems from the GSD’s Ecological Urbanism conference and dovetails with the duo’s ongoing efforts to explore sustainability in our cities of the future. More than 100 participating architects and designers have provided content for the project, including such heavyweights as OMA, Rem Koolhaas, Kara Oehler, and Stefano Boeri. And the ever-evolving app allows designers and academics to add research and project updates as they happen.

Harvard Graduate School of Design: Ecological Urbanism App from Second Story on Vimeo.

Images: courtesy of iTunes Preview

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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