InstantVantage/Flickr

It has become a Beantown tradition.

Instead of paying the lousy city for issuing a lousy parking ticket, Boston residents can donate a new toy of equal or greater value to a charity for underprivileged children.

This is the 19th year that Boston has operated the "Toys for Tickets" program, through which any non-public safety parking ticket issued between today and Saturday may be paid in toys. Ticketed Bostonians have until December 8 to bring in toys, with receipt, to have tickets voided.

In 2010, the Toys for Tickets program contributed over $3,000 worth of toys to charity.

Top image: Flickr user InstantVantage.

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