Unconventional ideas for climate-proofing New York City.

The interactive graphic below comes courtesy of Climate Desk, a journalistic collaboration between The Atlantic, Mother Jones, Slate, and others, dedicated to exploring the impact—human, environmental, economic, political—of a changing climate. Learn more at theclimatedesk.org.



Top image: A playground sits submerged under flood waters left from Hurricane Sandy at the Breezy Point section of the Queens. (Keith Bedford/Reuters)

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