Aether & Hemera

Like being a kid again...a kid with state-of-the-art technology and materials.

These docks have long ceased to be the commercial hub of the British Empire, the forest of masts replaced by an outcropping of skyscrapers.

But until February, the water will feature an interactive lighting installation, "Voyage," that looks back to that seafaring history.

Artists Claudio Benghi and Gloria Ronchi -- who go by the name Aether & Hemera -- have set a fleet of "paper" boats afloat at London's Canary Wharf. The boats will glow on the waves thanks to a highly technical solution that connects their sturdy, polypropylene bodies, and will be able to respond to commands from onlookers' cellphones. 

"The aim of the artwork," according to the group, "is to allow viewers to travel and sail with absolute freedom to all the places they care to imagine."

All images courtesy of Aether & Hemera.

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