Reuters

Apple theft is so bad it's having an effect on the overall crime rate.

Because it just means you're exactly like everyone else. The problem with Apple theft is so bad it's having an effect on the overall crime rate for New York City. 

"If you just took away the jump in Apple, we’d be down for the year," Marc La Vorgna, Mayor Bloomberg’s press secretary, told The New York Times. Crime in New York, for the most part, is on the decline. 2012 saw the murder rate in Gotham City hit a new record low: 414 murders in 2012, compared to 471 in 2009. Which is great! And the police are excited about their numbers, because it means they're doing their job and the city is safe, even if it's mostly because of questionable policies like stop and frisk.

But the one thing holding them back from having a positive year across the board is the confusing increase in Apple-related thefts

The Police Department said thefts of Apple products had risen by 3,890, which was more than the overall increase in "major crimes."

Seriously, they have no idea how to stop it or what's triggering it. (Except the overall coolness of Apple products, we guess.) And it's not really something you can fight directly, because you can't protect citizens who have Apple stuff more than, say, citizens with Android stuff. That creates more concerning problems in the long run. 

But, we should mention, Android users are free to complain if their stuff gets stolen. "[Police Commissioner Ray] Kelly said the thefts of non-Apple devices had declined," the Times notes.

Top image: New York Police Department officers wait to register newly purchased iPhones outside of the Apple Store on 5th Avenue following the release of the Apple iPhone 5 phone in New York. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Four young adults exercise in a dark, neon-lit gym.
    Life

    Luxury Gyms Invite You to Work Out, Hang Out, Or Just Work

    With their invite-only policies and coworking spaces, high-end urban gyms aspire to be fitness studio, social club, and office rolled into one.

  2. Anthony Bourdain in 2001, when he was still the chef-owner of Les Halles in New York City.
    Life

    Urbanists Could Learn a Lot From Anthony Bourdain

    The work of the acclaimed chef and writer, who has died at 61, provides a model for a truly inclusive urbanism based on the creativity of all human beings.

  3. Charts

    The Evolution of Urban Planning in 10 Diagrams

    A new exhibit from the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association showcases the simple visualizations of complex ideas that have changed how we live.

  4. Rows of machinery with long blue tubes and pipes seen at a water desalination plant.
    Environment

    A Water-Stressed World Turns to Desalination

    Desalination is increasingly being used to provide drinking water around the globe. But it remains expensive and creates its own environmental problems.

  5. Design

    What Cities Can Do to Help Birds and Bees Survive

    Pollinators—the wildlife that shuffle pollen between flowers—are being decimated. But they may still thrive with enough help from urban humans.

×