Reuters

Apple theft is so bad it's having an effect on the overall crime rate.

Because it just means you're exactly like everyone else. The problem with Apple theft is so bad it's having an effect on the overall crime rate for New York City. 

"If you just took away the jump in Apple, we’d be down for the year," Marc La Vorgna, Mayor Bloomberg’s press secretary, told The New York Times. Crime in New York, for the most part, is on the decline. 2012 saw the murder rate in Gotham City hit a new record low: 414 murders in 2012, compared to 471 in 2009. Which is great! And the police are excited about their numbers, because it means they're doing their job and the city is safe, even if it's mostly because of questionable policies like stop and frisk.

But the one thing holding them back from having a positive year across the board is the confusing increase in Apple-related thefts

The Police Department said thefts of Apple products had risen by 3,890, which was more than the overall increase in "major crimes."

Seriously, they have no idea how to stop it or what's triggering it. (Except the overall coolness of Apple products, we guess.) And it's not really something you can fight directly, because you can't protect citizens who have Apple stuff more than, say, citizens with Android stuff. That creates more concerning problems in the long run. 

But, we should mention, Android users are free to complain if their stuff gets stolen. "[Police Commissioner Ray] Kelly said the thefts of non-Apple devices had declined," the Times notes.

Top image: New York Police Department officers wait to register newly purchased iPhones outside of the Apple Store on 5th Avenue following the release of the Apple iPhone 5 phone in New York. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    With Trains Like Schwebebahn, No Wonder Germans Love Public Transit

    Infrastructure like this makes it clear why Germany continues to produce enthusiasm for public transit, generation after generation.

  2. Children and adults sit on and around a deck with multi-colored chairs and giant LEGOs.
    POV

    If You Build It, They Might Not Come: Animating City Spaces

    Why do revamped areas remain barren after so much thought and money are put into redesigning them? A case study in Charlotte, North Carolina, offers clues.

  3. Transportation

    You Can’t Design Bike-Friendly Cities Without Considering Race and Class

    Bike equity is a powerful tool for reducing inequality. Too often, cycling infrastructure is tailored only to wealthy white cyclists.

  4. Amazon HQ2

    Amazon’s HQ2 Fiasco Will Cost the Company More Than It Costs New York

    The mega-company has bucked dealing reasonably with New York City, Seattle, and any community that asks them to pay for its freight.

  5. a photo of a used needle in a park in Lawrence, Massachusetts.
    Equity

    Why the Rural Opioid Crisis Is Different From the Urban One

    As deaths from heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioids soar in the U.S., a new study looks at the geographic factors driving the drug overdose epidemic.