The largest iceberg breakup ever caught on film.

So, wow. Wowwowwow. A group of filmmakers, making a movie called, aptly, Chasing Ice, have captured what they claim to be the largest iceberg calving ever filmed. After weeks of waiting, The Guardian reports, the filmakers witnessed 7.4 cubic km -- nearly 2 cubic miles -- of ice crashing off the Ilulissat glacier in Greenland. The movie, which is playing in the States in a handful of theaters and will be released in the UK tomorrow, follows photographer James Balog's mission to document the Arctic ice that is being melted by climate change.

And this video -- a teaser for the film -- is a striking way to start a publicity tour. It's haunting and beautiful and, you know, terrible. It's mesmerizing. It's like watching a natural Manhattan, Balog says, "breaking apart in front of your eyes."

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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