Flickr/SmartDestinations

An "important message" from CEO Byrd-Bennett.

As if any typo from the school commissioner weren't bad enough.

Yesterday, Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett sent parents an email about the Common Core, an adjustment to the Illinois Learning Standards, which defines what students in the state should be taught in school.

At the bottom of said email, Byrd-Bennett included a URL for the Illinois State Board of Education page on the Common Core, at the domain isbe.net. Or so she thought.

In fact, she sent a few hundred thousand parents to isbel.net, a "community of modern women who embrace sex as natural, beautiful and nourishing." Nothing wrong with that, except the context.

But the error message (to which recipients were directed) is a little suggestive:

The lesson of all this? Never type out URLS. It's 2013 folks, let's get into the habit of doing copy and paste.

Update, 5:30 p.m.: Isbel, for one, is making the most of this. Their Facebook announced a special landing page for Illinois mothers, "to thank the CPS for sharing Isbel with the world":

Top image: Flickr/SmartDestinations.

H/T Chicagoist

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