Five winners will be announced this spring, but these ideas stand out above the rest.

We've been following the Bloomberg Philanthropies' Mayors Challenge since the city innovation contest (and the $9 million in total prize money that comes with it) was announced last summer. With an aim of encouraging "breakthrough solutions" in city governance, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg invited any U.S. city with a population of 30,000 or more to submit entries that would be judged based on their "boldness, strength of planning, potential for impact, and replicability" in other cities. Twenty finalists (out of 305 entries) were announced in November, and now the Huffington Post has collected testimonials and videos from the mayors of each city still in the running. Five winners will be announced this spring, but in the meantime the public is being invited to vote for their favorites. Of the 20 finalists, the eight ideas below struck us as particularly compelling. Which city do you think should win the $5 million first place prize?

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: bicyclists in Paris during a transit strike in December.
    Transportation

    Paris Mayor: It's Time for a '15-Minute City'

    In her re-election campaign, Mayor Anne Hidalgo says that every Paris resident should be able to meet their essential needs within a short walk or bike ride.

  2. animated illustration: cars, bikes, scooters and drones in motion.
    Transportation

    This City Was Sick of Tech Disruptors. So It Decided to Become One.

    To rein in traffic-snarling new mobility modes, L.A. needed digital savvy. Then came a privacy uproar, a murky cast of consultants, and a legal crusade by Uber.

  3. Life

    Why Amsterdam May Clamp Down on Weed and Sex Work

    Proposals to ban cannabis for tourists and relocate the red-light district would dramatically reshape the city’s anything-goes image.

  4. An aerial photo of downtown Miami.
    Life

    The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

    Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

  5. Design

    How We Map Epidemics

    Cartographers are mapping the coronavirus in more sophisticated ways than past epidemics. But visualizing outbreaks dates back to cholera and yellow fever.

×