They're not just for hippies anymore.

It's like the Tour de France for clowns. But falling would be no laughing matter.

Extreme mountain unicycling has, after twenty years of underground play, finally hit the big time, in a video that has the potential to reinvent the world's view of unicycling.

The stars are Lutz Eichholz, a self-described professional unicyclist, and Stephanie Dietz, who has sixteen years of unicycling experience under her belt. And they're about to unicycle down what appears to be a straight-up hiking trail in the Dolomite Mountains.

Interestingly, unlike mountain biking, which forces riders to sit at the angle of the slope, unicylists seem able to remain mostly upright.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  2. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  3. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

  4. A new map of neighborhood change in U.S. metros shows where displacement is the main problem, and where economic decline persists.
    Equity

    From Gentrification to Decline: How Neighborhoods Really Change

    A new report and accompanying map finds extreme gentrification in a few cities, but the dominant trend—particularly in the suburbs—is the concentration of low-income population.

  5. a photo of San Francisco tourists posing before the city's iconic skyline.
    Life

    Cities Don’t Have Souls. Why Do We Battle For Them?

    What do we mean when we say that the “soul of the city” is under threat? Often, it’s really about politics, nostalgia, and the fear of community change.