OpenPlans

What could you change in your community if you just knew more about it?

The inventive urban data geeks over at OpenPlans are celebrating the first anniversary this week of New York City's open data law with a simple but wonderful little exercise in public imagination. Sarah Goodyear writes today about the importance of that landmark law passed in 2012, which established what many open-government advocates consider the standard in municipal transparency.

The goal, though, was never just to access data for data's sake. Rather, unlocked data makes other things possible. For example:

With a "lil' software experiment," OpenPlans is inviting people to fill in that Mad Lab to expand the public conversation on how newly accessible data can tangibly change neighborhoods, decisions and how cities and citizens interact anywhere. A few of our favorite responses already curated by the site on Twitter:

And, OK, playful input is welcome, too.

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