Can the city become the next great start-up hub?

Miami is in the midst of trying to redefine itself from a resort town with some of the world's best beach-side night clubs to a serious center of tech and innovation. And local entrepreneurs behind the push are honest about how far the South Florida metro still has to go, even as it draws on two enviable assets its design culture and connection to Latin America that many would-be tech hubs lack.

Juan Diego Calle, the CEO of Miami-based Internet domain company .Co, puts it this way in the below video from Atlantic video editor Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg: "This idea that there’s no talent in Miami, that’s not true. There’s a lot of talent in Miami – but it’s temporarily misplaced. They have jobs in New York, they have jobs in Silicon Valley. And we need to bring them back."

The video was shot during last month's Atlantic Live Start-up City: Miami event in Miami Beach, including interviews with former Miami mayor Manny Diaz, University of Miami School of Architecture Dean Elizabeth Plater-Zybrek and Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh.

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