A new online game has a very simple goal: guess the city in a Google Street View. That's harder than it sounds, let me tell you.

A new online game has a very simple goal: guess the city in a Google Street View. That's harder than it sounds, let me tell you.

According to the Hungarian studio Nemesys Games's website, the game has been played over 200,000 times since its launch about two weeks ago.

The first few cities are relatively easy to guess. My bravado soon disappeared, however, and I resorted to searching for English advertisements blatantly spelling out the city's name. It wouldn't be so tricky if it wasn't timed. But stroll down the wrong alley and suddenly you're stuck far, far away in cobblestone residential-ville. Once the timer runs out, you can try again but you're sent back to that city's starting point.

(Also, there's a "Hardcore Mode" for those wanting to guess the street AND city. Good luck.)

Screenshot of Pursued

(H/T Google Maps Mania)

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