An international mobile application contest from the New Cities Foundation.

New Cities Foundation first announced the 2013 AppMyCity! prize, they've received close to 100 qualified applications from developers all over the world. Today they've announced the list of ten semi-finalists still in the running, who hail from six countries and five continents. From this list, a panel of judges will now select three finalists who will travel to the New Cities Summit in São Paulo (June 4-6) to compete for a $5,000 cash prize. Without further ado, let's meet the semi-finalists, who were chosen based on their ability to enhance the urban experience and their potential impact:

Since our partners at the

AirCasting, from New York City, USA, is a platform for recording, mapping and sharing health and environmental data through real-world measurements, annotations and CrowdMap sharing.

BuzzJourney, from Kfar-Saba, Israel, is a social transportation app that provides all means of urban transportation via bus, train, taxi, bike rental and even ride sharing.

Colab, from Recife, Brazil, creates a social network for citizenship that connects citizens to cities.

Dérive app, from Johannesburg, South Africa, is a randomly generated way to explore in and engage with a city.

iWhisper, from Utrecht, Netherlands, transforms cities into inspiring and surprising playgrounds for both citizens and tourists.

Paprika, from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is an app that combines the virtual and real worlds and allows one to discover a new kind of interaction wherever you are.

PublicStuff, from Philadelphia, USA, helps local governments turn civic inquiries into tangible community improvements by enabling residents to connect to their representatives through their mobilephones, laptops and tablets.

Urbanias, from São Paulo, Brazil, is a Social-Local-Mobile platform encouraging users to explore and observe local happenings.

VaiRio, from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, guides locals and visitors through traffic, reducing commute times and greenhouse gas emissions by delivering geo-content on transit options, according to the most frequent routes by registered users.

Walkability app, from New Delhi, India, crowdsources data on walkability to inform government on how to recreate walkable urban spaces.

The finalists will be announced here at The Atlantic Cities and at the AppMyCity! website on May 7. Thanks to the support of Google, the New Cities Foundation will invite the three selected finalists to the invitation-only New Cities Summit, in São Paulo, Brazil. Good luck to the remaining contestants!

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo-illustration of several big-box retail stores.
    Equity

    After the Retail Apocalypse, Prepare for the Property Tax Meltdown

    Big-box retailers nationwide are slashing their property taxes through a legal loophole known as "dark store theory." For the towns that rely on that revenue, this could be a disaster.

  2. A man walks his dog on a hilltop overlooking San Francisco in the early morning hours on Mount Davidson.
    Equity

    When Millennials Battle Boomers Over Housing

    In Generation Priced Out, Randy Shaw examines how Boomers have blocked affordable housing in urban neighborhoods, leaving Millennial homebuyers in the lurch.

  3. A photo shows the Amazon logo on a building.
    Amazon HQ2

    Amazon’s HQ2 Spectacle Isn’t Just Shameful—It Should Be Illegal

    Each year, local governments spend nearly $100 billion to move headquarters and factories between states. It’s a wasteful exercise that requires a national solution.

  4. A photo of a small small house in San Francisco's Noe Valley that sold for $1.8 million in 2014.
    Equity

    Why Cities Must Tackle Single-Family Zoning

    As cities wake up to their housing crises, the problems with single-family-home residential zoning will become too egregious to ignore.

  5. A map of states with laws that make voting more difficult.
    Equity

    Voting Rights Aren’t Just a Black Issue: They Affect Poor People of All Races

    The Poor People's Campaign is building a multi-ethnic national force to “save the democracy,” and end the cross-racial poverty it sees as born of racialized voter suppression.