Swooping shots from extreme sports photographers.

Teton Gravity Research, a production company based in in Wyoming, has produced more than 20 films about skiing, snowboarding, and other action sports since the mid-1990s. When it comes to getting swooping aerial shots of dramatic landscapes, they're the experts. In their latest reel they show off what they call "the world's most advanced gyro-stabilized camera system," a RED Epic mounted on a GSS C520. With 5 axes of motion, the camera can track landmarks like the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, and the Transamerica Pyramid as it skims by. At about 2:45 you can see the new Bay Lights LED installation created by artist Leo Villareal. Watch full screen and crank the volume for an extreme experience. 

For more videos by Teton Gravity Research, visit http://www.tetongravity.com/.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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