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Watch the world grow.

Want to see if the world's population will truly level off in 2050?

Keep a close eye on these new widgets released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. They allow you to track, in real time, the expanding population of the U.S. and the world. Good news for those worried about overpopulation: the numbers aren't changing too fast to see.

You can also peruse regional population trends here in the United States, where the South and West are growing at the expense of the Northeast and Midwest:

And then there's the humanoid curves of the bar graph showing the male and female population, by age:

And last but certainly not least, population and density charts for cities, states and counties.

All widgets courtesy of U.S. Census Bureau. Top image: Shutterstock/amasterphotographer.

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