Oh, and it's 115 years old, too. 

It's not unusual to see the odd beach-house balanced on posts, hoisted above the rising tide. 

But a 7-million-pound building, dating from 1898, in the shadow of the Wasatch Mountains? That's what is floating 40 feet in the air in Provo, Utah, at the behest of the Church of Jesus Christ and the Latter-Day Saints.

When the Provo Tabernacle caught fire in 2010, much of the inside was ruined, but large parts of the facade remained standing. To reconstruct the building as a Mormon temple, engineers had to suspend the facade on stilts while digging out the ground around it to create room for a basement and a solid structural foundation.

Top image via MormonNewsroom.

HT: Colossal.

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