(Disney/Marvel Studios)

Just in case you weren't sure.

The city of Chattanooga, Tennessee, is understandably proud of its gigabit municipal Internet network. The two year-old system is one of the largest such networks in the U.S., after all, not to mention the first of its kind. Which helps explain why a publicist working for the Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce emailed us today to protest what it's describing as an "inaccurate depiction of Chattanooga" in Iron Man 3:

In the movie, Iron Man had a hard time with a slow Internet connection. If Iron Man had visited the real Chattanooga, he would have been saving the world with the help of the first American city to offer gig-a-second Internet speeds (1,000 megabits per second), which Chattanooga has made available to every home and business across a 600 square mile service area since 2010.

Of course, the scene in question features Tony Stark struggling to get a fast enough broadband connection while commandeering a local TV news van on remote assignment, so it's not actually clear that the initially weak signal was coming from Chattanooga's gig network at all. What is clear is that Chattanooga is wasting no time drumming up a little publicity for itself on the strength of a film that just scored the second biggest opening weekend box office of all time.

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