Wikipedia Recent Changes Map

The map offers a nifty live survey of people's utterly random interests (or perceived areas of expertise).

In the last 35 seconds, as of this writing, someone in Gambier, Ohio, updated the Wikipedia page about Erykah Badu. Someone in Rostov, Russia changed the page for the movie Django Unchained, and someone in San Francisco had something to say about the Maserati Ghibli III, an as-yet-nonexistent car expected to be unveiled at the Shanghai Motor Show in 2014.

Also imperceptibly modified in this same sliver of cyber-time: John Dillinger's profile, Wikipedia's "List of fictional robots and androids," and a page on the Middlesbrough Football Club, known, of course, as Boro for short by fans of the English Football League Championship.

The edits come so quickly from across the globe that you'd best screen-grab this addicting live Wikipedia Recent Changes Map if you want to keep track of them. Here, we have just a sampling of 867 edits to the English-language version of the crowdsourced encyclopedia of absolutely everything, logged within 35 seconds:

The site was built by Stephen LaPorte and Mahmoud Hashemi, using the IP addresses of unregistered contributors to Wikipedia. Registered users don't leave a similar geographic fingerprint, so this tsunami of edits actually represents just a small portion of all of the people fiddling with Wikipedia at any given moment. Unregistered users make about 20 percent of the edits to English Wikipedia, although, as LaPorte and Hashemi write:

“A survey in 2007 indicated that unregistered users are less likely to make productive edits to the encyclopedia.”

The map offers a nifty live survey of people's utterly random interests (or perceived areas of expertise), and it also visualizes a phenomenon we've written about before: The geography of who's editing Wikipedia often has very little to do with the geography of the subject matter itself.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    The Diverging Diamond Interchange Is Coming to a Road Near You

    Drivers may be baffled by these newfangled intersections, but they’re safer than traditional four-way stops.

  2. Workers in downtown London head to their jobs.
    POV

    How Cities Can Rebuild the Social Safety Net

    In an age of employment uncertainty and a growing income gap, urban America needs to find new ways to support its citizens.

  3. Environment

    Visualize the Path of the Eclipse With Live Traffic Data

    On Google Maps, a mass migration in progress.

  4. The Presidio Terrace neighborhood
    POV

    The Problem of Progressive Cities and the Property Tax

    The news that a posh San Francisco street was sold for delinquent taxes exposes the deeper issue with America’s local revenue system.

  5. A woman sits reading on a rooftop garden, with the dense city of Tokyo surrounding her.
    Solutions

    Designing a Megacity for Mental Health

    A new report assesses how Tokyo’s infrastructure affects residents’ emotional well-being, offering lessons for other cities.