Toyota

Say hello to a car without any of the fat.

Feeling bad about your generation's environmental legacy?

This may be the car for you. It's a collaboration between Toyota and the French industrial designer Jean-Marie Massaud, and it does for cars what architects did for buildings a century ago: strip away the fat and leave only the essentials.

It's called the ME.WE, because its designers believe it solves a number of apparent contradictions. It manages to be both light and resilient, they say; customized (with swappable colored panels) and easy to manufacture.

It certainly is light -- at 1,650 pounds, it weighs about two-thirds what the similar-looking Mini Cooper does. And it's entirely electric. What it would look like in a collision is another story.

HT: FastCo.

All images courtesy Toyota.

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