Flickr/ElCapitanBSC

The Marlins are tanking, and dragging the MLB down with them.

Baseball is not off to a great start this year, with attendance down 2.9 percent.

There are a few reasons for this. A couple of big-market, big-spending clubs -- the Dodgers and Blue Jays -- have fallen flat. The Yankees aren't themselves. And the weather has been awful.

But one failure dwarfs them all: the god-awful Miami Marlins, and their splendid, expensive, and empty new stadium. In his column on SI today, Tom Verducci crunches the numbers and determines that the Marlins are responsible for 40 percent of baseball's attendance dip.

The Marlins, of course, are the team that Jeffrey Loria built up and then ran into the ground, but not before convincing Miami taxpayers to foot the bill for his Xanadu, a baseball stadium/con that has been emptier than a rush-hour subway train. The Marlins are 13-41, and their winning percentage is still better than the percentage of seats they fill each game.

HT Deadspin.

Top image: Marlins Ballpark in better times, September 2012.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    A Horrifying Glimpse Into Your Dystopian Future Transit Commute

    A comic artist’s take on what the future of transportation might really feel like.

  2. A cyclist rides on the bike lane in the Mid Market neighborhood during Bike to Work Day in San Francisco,
    Perspective

    Why Asking for Bike Lanes Isn't Smart

    In the 1930s big auto dreamed up freeways and demanded massive car infrastructure. Micromobility needs its own Futurama—one where cars are marginalized.

  3. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  4. Uber Eats worker
    Life

    The Millennial Urban Lifestyle Is About to Get More Expensive

    As WeWork crashes and Uber bleeds cash, the consumer-tech gold rush may be coming to an end.

  5. Environment

    A 13,235-Mile Road Trip for 70-Degree Weather Every Day

    This year-long journey across the U.S. keeps you at consistent high temperatures.

×