It's heatin' up out there folks.

It's a buyer's market for commuters in the Bay Area, where start-ups Uber, SideCar, and Lyft compete with traditional taxi companies to give harried San Franciscans a ride to work.

But it's not all fun and games: where competition goes, so negative advertising must follow.

Not content to let the service speak for itself, Uber has released a series of advertisements urging area residents to "shave the 'stache," a reference to Lyft's iconic pink mustache.

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick responded defensively:

Earlier, Matthew Ernest, who drives the DiscoLYFT car, shared a photo of the anti-Lyft ad and retorted: "I’m proud to be a part of a community with a bit more tact in their marketing and recruiting. #lyftLOVE #UBERfail." Ernest's post now seems to have been deleted.

No word yet on how or whether SideCar plans to enter the fray.

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