Time for a cigarette break out on my balcony – AGGH!

Ever stare up at a sky-kissing construction crane and wonder what's stopping it from falling over? The answer is at the very bottom, where work crews have fixed the tower in a massive concrete pad days or weeks before the building's begun.

That's the theory, anyway, and it doesn't always bear out in the real world. The importance of a structurally perfect crane anchor was on display this Sunday in Kirov, a city of 474,000 people located about 500 miles northeast of Moscow. Forceful winds blowing through a construction site began to move a huge crane sideways, setting it up for a destructive date with gravity and an apartment building.

Reports RT:

“When the wind blew, I saw the crane running on rails about 100 meters in the direction of the house. As soon as it bumped into the stop, it fell down onto the 9-story house,” a witness said.

Seven cars parked in front of the apartment building were crushed under the boom heap of the collapsed crane. No one was injured in the incident.

The crane slashed an ugly tear through a series of balconies, canceling several residents' open-air smoking breaks for the foreseeable future. Meanwhile, construction workers on the site continued to go about their duties as if nothing had happened, according to the person who filmed this video:

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    The Problem With 'Fast-Casual Architecture'

    Washington, D.C., has a huge new waterfront development that’s fun, popular, and easy on the eyes. Is anything wrong with that?

  2. A man walks his bicycle beside a train in Paris.
    Maps

    Breaking Down the Many Ways Europe's City-Dwellers Get to Work

    One chart shows which cities do best when it comes to biking, walking, or taking public transit to work.

  3. Equity

    How a Fart Became Berlin's Weirdest Policing Scandal

    It's taken an incredible amount of resources to get to the bottom of this one.

  4. Maps

    Mapping Where Europe's Population Is Moving, Aging, and Finding Work

    Younger people are fleeing rural areas, migrating northward, and having fewer children. Here’s how that’s changing the region.

  5. Design

    Experimental City: The Sci-Fi Utopia That Never Was

    With solar energy, recycling, computers, and personal mass transit, the 1960s-era Minnesota Experimental City was a prescient and hopeful vision of the urban future. A new documentary tells its story.