New Cities Foundation

The app aims to connect citizens to their local governments in new ways.

Colab, a Brazilian mobile application designed to encourage better citizenship, is the winner of the 2013 AppMyCity! Prize for the year's best urban app.

The app's five founders, Bruno Aracaty, Gustavo Maia, Paulo Pandolfi, Josemando Sobral and Vitor Guedes, from Recife and São Paulo, claimed the $5,000 prize last week at the annual New Cities Summit in São Paulo. Colab competed against two other finalists, BuzzJourney, from Kfar-Saba, Israel, and PublicStuff, from New York City. All three finalists presented their project to the international audience at the New Cities Summit. The audience then voted to determine the winner.

Colab utilizes photos and geolocation to connect citizens to cities based on three pillars of interaction: reporting daily urban issues; elaborating on and proposing new projects and solutions; and evaluating public services.

In total, the New Cities Foundation received 92 submissions for the AppMyCity! Prize 2013. A panel of judges chose the finalists out of ten semi-finalists, based on ability to create widespread impact and helpful user interface.

“Colab truly epitomizes AppMyCity!’s motto: mobile apps make good cities great. By connecting people to their local governments and their fellow citizens in new ways, this app has the potential to revolutionize urban governance," said Mathieu Lefevre, executive director of the New Cities Foundation and AppMyCity! judge.

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